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Aegon Studien 2015

Aegon Ruhestandsstudien 2015

Die Erwerbstätigen in Deutschland genießen viele Vorteile, die ihnen das Sparen für einen komfortablen Ruhestand erleichtern. Dennoch gilt es noch viele Herausforderungen zu meistern bis jeder in der Lage ist, sich finanziell adäquat auf den Ruhestand vorzubereiten. Bei über zwei Fünftel (42%) der Erwerbstätigen ab 50 Jahre besteht die Gefahr, dass sie unzureichend auf den Ruhestand vorbereitet sind.

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  • Aegon Ruhestandsstudie 2015 Deutschland
    Methodik

    Für die Aegon Ruhestandsstudie 2015 wurden 16.000 Erwerbstätige und Rentner in 15 Ländern, darunter 1.000 aus Deutschland, befragt. Mit einem seit dem Vorjahr unveränderten Wert von 6,1 (von 10) belegt Deutschland weiterhin Platz 5 im weltweiten Vergleich.

    Wichtigste Erkenntnisse

    Die Deutschen sehen ihrem Ruhestand mehrheitlich positiv entgegen. Hinsichtlich der Finanzierung dieser Zeit sind sie jedoch nicht so optimistisch. Gerade einmal 15% der Erwerbstätigen sind sehr oder äußerst zuversichtlich, im Ruhestand ein nach eigenen Maßstäben komfortables Leben führen zu können.

    Fast die Hälfte aller Befragten (43%) ist nicht genau über ihr zukünftiges Einkommen im Ruhestand informiert. Bei über 42% der Erwerbstätigen ab 50 Jahre besteht die Gefahr, dass sie unzureichend auf die Zeit nach dem Erwerbsleben vorbereitet sind.

    Die staatliche Rente und Unterstützung ist das gängigste Altersvorsorgeinstrument. Erwerbstätige tendieren in hohem Maße zu einer Form von Rentenzahlung, die eine regelmäßige Einkommensquelle darstellt.

  • Aegon Ruhestandsstudie 2015 Global (englisch)
    Methodology

    The findings in this report are based on the responses of 14,400 employees and 1,600 fully retired people in 15 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Interviews were conducted online between 6th and 23rd February 2015.

    Key Findings 2015

    1. Emerging markets continue to forge ahead...

     

    The sense of retirement readiness is greatest in emerging markets where real incomes have been growing fastest in recent decades. People in these countries also benefit from high interest rate environments, boosting the value of their savings and creating a sense of readiness.

    2. Workplace retirement plans contribute to a greater sense of retirement readiness...

     

    Among the industrialized countries, the sense of retirement readiness is greatest where workplace retirement plan arrangements are well established. This includes Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, the U.S. and the U.K. Japan is an outlier where people are less likely to feel retirement ready, perhaps reflecting the country's zero interest rate environment and retirement reforms over recent years.

    3. Meanwhile, concerns about social security reforms loom large...

     

    In countries where government retirement benefits are expected to make up a large part of retirement incomes, people generally feel less prepared, reflecting concerns about those systems' sustainability and future reforms that may lead to a reduction in the level of entitlements. Today's working age population is already calculating that future social security pay-outs will be less generous.

    3. Loss of financial independence and increased dependency on spouse‘s income

    4. Those saving on a habitual basis feel more adequately prepared for their retirement

     

    Over one-third (36%) of habitual savers achieved a high index score of 8 to 10. This compares with just 3% of those who hold aspirations to save. So just putting something aside for their retirement on a monthly basis will make a difference to a person's confidence in his/her retirement readiness.

    Adopting this simple savings behaviour is also a realistic aspiration for most individuals. The profile of the habitual saver reveals that this group is not ultra wealthy. In fact, they earn on average around $41,000 annually (equalling $29,000 in emerging markets), which is not much higher than the typical annual salary in most countries surveyed.

    5. Women continue to lag behind men in their retirement confidence

     

    Lower earnings, more time out of the workforce (caring for children or other family members), and working part-time remain the key factors affecting women's savings power and retirement readiness. Fifty-seven percent of women achieved a low Index score (less than 6), compared with just 47% of men, who are more likely to be found in the medium and high scoring groups.

    6. Younger people also struggle to build their retirement readiness

     

    This might be expected to some degree – building a retirement plan takes time, so we would expect those nearing retirement to feel more prepared for it. Younger people also have to contend with other priorities, such repaying student loans or saving to buy a house. What is most concerning is that we don't see any change in retirement readiness among those younger age groups.

    It is not until we look at those in their mid-40s that readiness improves. The number of people continually scoring low on the ARRI remains persistently high (between 56% and 59%) among those aged between 18 and 44.

    This highlights the need to get people saving consistently, and from a far younger age to enable them to have a sufficiently long time horizon to build their retirement savings. However, it is never too late to start saving, and developing a plan for retirement will help.

     
  • Homemakers Report 2015 (englisch)
    Methodology

    The findings in this report are based on the responses of 14,400 employees and 1,600 homemakers, 100 in each country and 200 in China. The study was conducted across 15 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Interviews were conducted online in February 2015.

    Key Findings

    1. Who are the ho­me­makers?

    2. Ho­me­makers are less op­ti­mis­tic about re­ti­re­ment

    3. Loss of financial independence and increased dependency on spouse‘s income

    4. Alar­ming lack of ade­qua­te fi­nan­ci­al plan­ning for re­ti­re­ment

    5. Ho­me­makers suf­fer from mis­sing ac­cess to the job mar­ket and work­place re­ti­re­ment pro­grams

    6. Lon­ge­vi­ty risk needs to be co­ve­r­ed ade­qua­te­ly


    Homemakers financially rely on their partners now and through retirement